Photo courtesy of Lincoln County Record A house in the small town of Panaca in Lincoln County was destroyed after a man set off a bomb in his rental car outside of the residence last Wednesday evening. Glenn Franklin Jones, who died in the blast, bought items from the Hawthorne Ordnance Museum multiple times over the past few years.

Photo courtesy of Lincoln County Record
A house in the small town of Panaca in Lincoln County was destroyed after a man set off a bomb in his rental car outside of the residence last Wednesday evening. Glenn Franklin Jones, who died in the blast, bought items from the Hawthorne Ordnance Museum multiple times over the past few years.

A man who set off bombs in the small town of Panaca frequented the Hawthorne Ordnance Museum.

Glenn Franklin Jones died in the blast on Wednesday, July 20 after detonating the bomb in a rental car outside the house of his former boss.

Nobody else was injured in the blasts.

Jones had frequented the Hawthorne Ordnance Museum over the past three years, purchasing “dummy” rounds.

Harold Warner, a volunteer at the museum, remembers Jones.

“He would buy stuff here for the past two to three years. He said he was working on a memorial at the Panaca Senior Center.”

Jones had served in the U.S. Army, was an explosives and demolition expert and was suffering from what neighbors claim was “depression” after the loss of his wife and mother.

The former nurse had worked at the Grover C. Dils Medical Center in the small town of Caliente after moving to Panaca, near the Utah border, after the loss of his wife and mother. He had spent the last few months traveling to Kingman, Ariz., where more explosives were found.

“He [Jones] was looking to move to Hawthorne to nurse, but then lost his license,” Warner said on Tuesday afternoon.

Jones would purchase dummy shells and plastic aglet bombs from the popular ordnance museum located here in Mineral County.

It is unknown if the explosives that were used in the blasts were from the museum.

Deputy Kingman police chief Rusty Cooper told the Las Vegas Review-Journal, “A total of 15 improvised explosive devises (IEDs) were located, of varying sizes and designs. During the scene processing ten of the IEDs were rendered safe in a vacant field just west of the RV park.”

Lincoln County investigators said that the IEDs used in the Panaca blast, which evacuated many people and sent debris 1-mile away from the blast area, may have been made with black powder or a gelatin-based explosive such as C4.

“The bombing was something one might see in Iraq or Afghanistan war zone,” Lincoln County Sheriff Kerry Lee said, when describing the bombing.

Jones was described as quiet and courteous but tormented while trying to dig out of depression. His mother had killed herself several years prior with a gun purchased by Jones. The wife had died prior to his mother. Others would say, “He had a fascination with sells and all things military.”

Jones’ last trip to Hawthorne, according to Warner was before Armed Forces Day, after losing his nursing license.
Currently, the case is being handled by the FBI.