A crowd of 60-70 people gathered at the Aurora cemetery on Aug. 9 for the dedication of a monument honoring 10 military veterans buried at the

A Union volunteer blows a lonely “Taps” for the fallen at the Aurora cemetery monument dedication on Aug. 9. 10 military veterans are buried in the old ghost town gravesite. (Stephen Tool photo)

A crowd of 60-70 people gathered at the Aurora cemetery on Aug. 9 for the dedication of a monument honoring 10 military veterans buried at the site. The dedication is part of Nevada’s sesquicentennial celebration.

A cool breeze drifted over the cemetery as attendees wandered from marker to marker to honor the fallen. The Mineral County Museum attached pamphlets at the markers of particular historical significance. All three commissioners of Mineral County attended the ceremony.

The ceremony started with an invocation by Pastor John Murray of Hawthorne’s First Baptist Church. Sue Silver followed with a brief history of Aurora and its cemetery.

Commissioner Jerrie Tipton followed with a speech about the cemetery and its importance to the area. She mentioned that tourists come from all over the world to visit the cemetery, which helps Mineral County’s economy.

Jeff Ulrich, the Bridgeport District Ranger, spoke of the U.S. Forest service dedication to the protection of historical sites. Sue Silver and Christina Boyle followed and took turns reading a short biography of each veteran.

The highlight of the day, the unveiling of the monument, followed with the assistance of Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War. The SUCVW also fired a cannon at the end of the unveiling and one of the members played “Taps.”

Pastor Murray gave the benediction and Georgana Mayne, director of the Mineral County Museum, spoke the closing words.

After the ceremony Commissioner Tipton spoke a few words to the Independent News. “It tickles me to death to be asked to participate in this ceremony. “This site and the town of Aurora are of great historical significance to our county. The weather was great, and it couldn’t have turned out better.”

Mayne expressed pleasure with the event. “I thought it went real well. We had many positive comments.”

Mayne also mentioned the hard work of Silver as integral to the project’s success. Cemeteries are her love. That’s what got her involved in history and that’s what brought her to the museum.”

Mayne concluded, “Several of the old-time families told us how much they appreciated what we did, and that’s important to us.”