With increased interest in the Hawthorne Ordnance Museum (HOM), within the past month, the McDonald’s Family Restaurant in Hawthorne has requested the museum have on display a few of their ordnance items placed near their restaurant. With this request the Ordnance Museum initiated a written liability and displaying agreement between McDonald’s an

With increased interest in the Hawthorne Ordnance Museum (HOM), within the past month, the McDonald’s Family Restaurant in Hawthorne has requested the museum have on display a few of their ordnance items placed

An MK-37 torpedo, RIM-2 Terrier missile and PUR-5A ASROC missile from the Ordnance Museum is now on display on the grounds of the Hawthorne McDonald’s. (Tony Hughes photo)

d the museum by HOM Director/ Curator Peter Papadakos. HOM has placed three of the inert ordnance items at the restaurant by HOM forklift operator Harold Werner.  The first item was a MK-37 torpedo followed by a RIM-2 Terrier guided missile and last week a PUR-5A ASROC missile.

Each of these types of munitions were once used by the United States Navy. 

The MK-37 torpedo was developed by the US Navy after World War II and entered into service in the early 1950’s.  They were phased out of service during the 1970’s.  This torpedo weighed 1430 pounds, 135 inches long, 19 inches in diameter. The torpedo was launched from a submarine and had a range of 23,000 yards.

The RIM-2 Terrier guided missile is a ship borne missile launched from a vertical canister launching system and provides a rapid-fire launch capability against hostile threats.  The RIM-2 was a beam-rider with a 10 nm range at a speed of Mach 1.8.  It then got upgraded with a booster to become a semi-active radar homing system with a range of 40 nm at speeds as high as Mach 3.  It was replaced by the RIM-66 Standard Missile with an extended range, which the Hawthorne Ordnance Museum has on display inside the museum.  This missile was placed in service in 1986 and is used at the present time.

The PUR-5 ASROC (Anti-Submarine ROCKet) is an all-weather, all sea condition anti-submarine missile.  Developed by the US Navy in the 1950s, deployed in the 1960s and updated in 1990s and is installed on over 200 USN surface ships, specifically destroyers, cruisers and frigates.  ASROC has been deployed on scores of warships and by many navys.  The weight is 1,730 pounds, 14.75 feet long and 16.6 inches in diameter.

Stop by and see these munitions at McDonalds and then go the Hawthorne Ordnance Museum just a half a block from McDonald’s on Sierra Way and view the huge amount of munitions, weapons and large displays military memorabilia.  There is no admission at the museum.  Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and on Saturday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Everyone is welcome.